Poultry Disease


Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

SYMPTOMS

The acute form of avian influenza manifests itself through general weakness (apathy, loss of appetite, dull, scrubby plumage), high fever, breathing difficulties with open beak, edema on the head, neck, crest, wattles, legs and feet, blue discoloration of the skin and the Mucous membranes, watery-slimy and greenish diarrhea and neurological disorders (strange posture of the head, motor disorders).

Under a chronic course, the laying performance decreases, the eggs have thin shells or are even shell-less.

Mortality depends on the age of the bird and the virulence of the pathogen. In the case of highly virulent pathogens, the disease is fatal in almost all animals. More than 15% of a flock of poultry can die before symptoms appear (peracute course).

PREVENTION

In principle, the animals could be effectively protected against avian influenza by a preventive vaccination. However, according to current knowledge, a live vaccine based on low pathogen pathogens is ruled out because of the risk of mutation. Immunization with inactivated influenza viruses is also controversial among experts, since no vaccine available to date prevents a later infection, the subsequent virus replication and the excretion of pathogenic viruses, rather only the clinical disease of the vaccinated animals is prevented. In this way, vaccinated animals can become virus carriers and spread pathogenic viruses. Another problem is the reliable (microbiological / serological) differentiation of the vaccinated animals from sick or contagious animals.

TREATMENT

In the event of outbreaks of avian influenza in animal husbandry, the entire animal population of the affected keeper is killed. The carcasses are burned or otherwise rendered harmless to prevent transmission to other livestock.


Bumblefoot

SYMPTOMS

A bumblefoot is an infection of the foot (especially on the balls of the feet) that should not be underestimated and is caused by various causes. A bumblefoot can, if left untreated, lead to the death of an animal. Bacteria (e.g. staphylococci) penetrate the skin at the injured part of the foot and lead to a purulent abscess. If a bumblefoot is left untreated, it is very likely that the encapsulated infection on the turkey’s foot will spread first to the tendons, muscles and joints and finally to the entire organism. Then it becomes life-threatening for the animal, which is why early detection is important and immediate treatment is necessary.

PREVENTION

Bumblefoot can be detected at an early stage by regular control of the feet, otherwise it will show up later in the form of mild or moderate lameness in the animal (protection of the affected foot). The bumble foot initially manifests itself swelling, scabs or a black point as the “entry point”. A good prophylaxis is clean underground, non-splintering perches and fine, soft bedding (e.g. hemp litter). A balanced, vitamin-rich feeding with grains, fresh fruit, vegetables, minerals and vitamins also contributes to the prevention. In addition, it is important to change the bedding regularly.

TREATMENT

First and foremost, it is always advisable to consult a poultry veterinarian in the case of a bumblefoot. In addition to the treatment (clearing out the purulent material and treating the wound), an antibiotic must be administered.
Important to know: The skin of the animal is very thick and leathery on the foot and the consistency of the pus, unlike humans, is extremely thick (similar to toothpaste). The affected foot of the animal must first be bathed in warm water with Betaisodona solution or similar. It is helpful to wrap the birds head in clothing during the treatment, so it can’t see anything, but can still breathe easily. First of all, the wound must be rinsed with Betaisodona solution or similar. Then an antiseptic ointment (e.g. Betaisodona ointment) in combination with Bepanthen creme for wound healing should be applied to the wound (please never ointment with a local anesthetic such as benzocaine, lidocaine or similar, as this is toxic for poultry, and can lead to death).

The wound should then be covered in a sterile manner and loosely connected with a sterile, elastic gauze bandage. As an intermediate layer, we recommend padding made of soft wadding to relieve pressure while walking. Finally, one protects against dirt and moisture self-adhesive bandage (blue or green – please not red, as the conspecifics feel encouraged to peck by the red color) as well as a layer of insulating tape under the bandage on the sole of the foot to protect against moisture. A wound check / bandage renewal is recommended every 2 days until completely healed. This can sometimes take 6-8 weeks, as the skin on the feet is slow heals and germs can penetrate the skin again at any time.


Fowl cholera

SYMPTOMS

Fowl cholera can come in two forms.

• The peracute / acute form is characterized by septicemia, which in the peracute course is characterized by sudden death, acute fatigue, decreasing feed consumption, blue discolouration, shortness of breath and bloody nasal discharge and diarrhea. The morbidity in herds is up to 50%.

• The chronic form manifests itself in runny nose, inflammation of the head appendages (comb, wattles – “lobular disease”), joint inflammation, paralysis, torticollis, balance disorders and possibly diarrhea.

PREVENTION

The treatment of sick animals is usually unsuccessful. Therapy is therefore aimed at preventive antibiosis for endangered contact animals (metaphylaxis). Here sulfonamides or fluoroquinolones are used. Penicillins are also effective.

TREATMENT

Treatment of sick animals is usually unsuccessful (see prevention).


Poultry Rhinitis

SYMPTOMS

  • Inflamed eyes
  • nasal discharge
  • rattling breath noises

PREVENTION

  • Barn hygiene
  • Disinfection of automatic feeders and drinking troughs
  • Avoidance of drafts in the stable
  • Vitamin supplements

Fowlpox

SYMPTOMS

After the second viraemia, the disease can manifest itself in different forms:

• The shape of the skin is characterized by papular changes, especially in non-feathered regions, around the eye, at the base of the beak, on the crest and on the posts. The papules dry up, turn yellowish and later brownish, and then fall off. If the course is mild, benign skin tumors often occur afterwards.

• The diphtheroid form is caused by fibrinous coatings on the mucous membranes in the beak and pharynx (oropharynx) and on the larynx. The diphtheroid form can be combined with skin symptoms.

• The septicemic form shows itself in general disorders such as fatigue, reluctance to eat and cyanosis. It usually ends fatally without the typical smallpox-like efflorescences occurring.

PREVENTION

A live vaccine can be used for prophylaxis. This is given to animals that have not yet been infected, especially in the event of birdpox outbreaks. Ornamental birds should be vaccinated at least in larger populations to protect them from canarypox. The vaccine is given intramuscularly or by piercing the skin (wing-web method).

TREATMENT

Treatment is not possible.


Gout

SYMPTOMS

Joint swelling and inflammation due to the build-up of uric acid in the joints and organs. This results in decreased enjoyment of exercise, emaciation and a poor general condition.

PREVENTION

  • Species-appropriate nutrition
  • Avoid overfeeding

Histomoniasis (Blackhead disease)

SYMPTOMS

In turkeys in particular, histomoniasis leads to a severe course of the disease, with severe damage to the appendix and liver of the host.

The morbidity and mortality in infected birds is extremely high. The typical symptoms of histomoniasis are rather unspecific and infected animals show apathetic behavior, closed eyes, a stilted gait and breathing difficulties. In turkeys, the appearance of sulfur-yellow droppings as a result of liver damage is most noticeable, but in chickens it usually only results in slimy diarrhea. Liver lesions, however, do not occur.

However, histomoniasis can only be diagnosed with certainty after death. In turkeys, histomoniasis causes visible, necrotic lesions in the liver. In addition, there is a severe, ulcerative inflammation in the appendix of infected birds, which is associated with a characteristic thickening of the intestinal mucosa. Young animals usually die a few days after the onset of the disease; in older animals a chronic course is often observed. The disease takes its name from the blue-red to black discoloration of the scalp, which does not always occur. Since the appearance of black heads is not a primary indicator of histomoniasis, the term black head disease is sometimes viewed as a misnomer. Sometimes other organs can also be affected by histomoniasis.


Healthy liver vs. damaged one.
(pictures by Michael Sagarese)

Sulfur-yellow poop due to Histomoniasis
(picture by Michael Sagarese)

Poult with Histomoniasis

PREVENTION

Regular deworming of the animals has a prophylactic effect.

TREATMENT

Since the histomoniasis pathogen was identified, a large number of substances have been studied over time.

Various pentavalent arsenic compounds, such as nitarsone or carbasone, have proven to be effective in prophylactic use. In the European Union, they are no longer approved for food-producing animals. In the USA, however, nitarson (4-nitrophenyl arsenic acid) is still used.

Nifursol, which has a preventive effect, is no longer permitted today, just like other nitrofurans; The approval of Nifursol was revoked on April 1, 2003 across the EU.

Other active ingredients against the disease are Ronidazole and Dimetridazole, which are also no longer approved for chickens in the European Union.


Avian infectious bronchitis

SYMPTOMS

The transmission occurs primarily as a droplet infection, whereby grains of dust and droplets laden with viruses can travel long distances. The virus colonizes the ciliated epithelium of the airways, but the fallopian tubes can also be affected. IB spreads rapidly in a herd, especially young animals show a high incidence of the disease. The losses can be up to 25%.

The incubation time is 18 to 36 hours. Clinically, there are shortness of breath, nasal discharge, rattling breath noises and conjunctivitis. In addition, general disorders with unwillingness to eat can be observed. Fallopian tube infections later lead to laying disorders such as thin-shelled eggs, crab eggs, reduced or completely absent laying activity (“false layers”) and reduced hatching rate.

PREVENTION

Vaccination from the third week of life.

TREATMENT

The rapid spread in the population and the clinical manifestations allow a suspected diagnosis. The diagnosis can be made by pathological examination of dead birds as well as with serological and virological detection methods. Mycoplasmosis, infectious laryngotracheitis, chicken cold and Newcastle disease, as well as non-infectious diseases (feeding errors), must be differentiated.

Treatment is symptomatic at best. The control is therefore mainly based on the vaccination, which can be carried out from the third week of life. Repeat it every three to four months in endangered areas.


Avian Infectious Laryngotracheitis (AILT)

SYMPTOMS

The pathogen causes mild to severe inflammation of the upper airways, mainly the larynx and windpipe (trachea). The disease occurs mainly in autumn and winter.

Clinically, it manifests itself in coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath, where the animals can choke out a bloody-colored mucus. Mild forms due to less virulent virus strains show up in sinusitis and conjunctivitis.

Pathological-anatomically, blood congestion and hyperemia of the larynx and trachea can be seen, if the course is severe, cheesy, diphtheroid coverings or pseudomembranes can appear, similar to the diphtheroid form of birdpox. In the epithelial cells, intranuclear inclusion bodies can be detected pathohistologically.

PREVENTION

see treatment

TREATMENT

The control is based on strict hygiene measures in poultry flocks to prevent the introduction of the pathogen. Vaccination with live vaccines is possible, but does not prevent latent infections or their flare-ups.


Coccidia

SYMPTOMS

Coccidia is associated with bloody diarrhea and can have a mortality rate of 80% in chicks.

PREVENTION

Hygiene and disinfection measures can be used as a preventive measure. Boiling water is sufficient to inactivate the oocysts. Too high a stocking density is to be avoided, alternating outlets are recommended. In the event of an outbreak, the soil or litter should be removed. Effective disinfectants are z. B. Cresols. Chickens can be treated prophylactically with a coccidiostat. Vaccination of week-long chicks through the drinking water (Paracox 8®) is also effective.

TREATMENT

The treatment is carried out with drugs that act as coccidiostat, such as sulfonamides such as sulfachlorpyrazine or sulfadimidine. In addition, Toltrazuril and Clazuril are effective. Amprolium is very effective against coccidia. The administration of multivitamin preparations is recommended as a supplement.


Gapeworm

SYMPTOMS

  • Whistling or rattling breath noises
  • Inflammation, swelling and small nodules at the attachment points, heavy mucus formation
  • Moderate anemia
  • Death from exhaustion or asphyxia

PREVENTION

Dry environment (prevents the formation of infectious larvae)

TREATMENT

Flubendazole


Egg Binding

SYMPTOMS

A female bird that is affected by laying binding can initially be recognized by unsuccessful laying attempts. It tries to excrete the egg by pressing hard. Relatively large and thin balls of feces are excreted, which are often mixed with blood. Affected females appear nervous and restless, they often change seats, sit with widely spread legs on perches or see-saws with their tails. Pressure on nerve plexuses can lead to symptoms of paralysis.

At a later stage, affected females sit completely exhausted on the floor. Often a slight bulge can be noticed when touching the abdomen.

If not responded, the female will go into shock and die. Under certain circumstances, the strong pressing can lead to a cloaca prolapse.

TREATMENT

In the initial stage, an increase in the air humidity and heat radiation help. Furthermore, with the help of castor oil (or similar), which is trickled into the cloaca, an attempt can be made to loosen the egg. An abdominal massage (should only be used with larger birds, however, since the egg in the cloaca can break in small birds) in conjunction with the female’s attempts to press can help. If no success is achieved after a maximum of two hours, a veterinarian must be notified immediately. He can try to manually push the egg out of the cloaca, if this fails, the hormone oxytocin can be administered.


Red Mite (Dermanyssus gallinae)

SYMPTOMS

The harmful effect of the red mite is caused by sucking blood, triggering itching and inflammation and the associated stress of the infected animals. Chicks and young birds can die due to the constant blood loss, even if the infestation is moderate. Direct deaths are also possible in broody birds.

Sick birds scratch their plumage irritably. There is inflammation and long-lasting itching at the bite sites. The mite infestation is particularly visible on the legs of the birds. In extreme cases, the skin here is severely swollen, crusted and flaky. Individual areas of the skin gradually peel off.


Red Mite
De AW – Trabajo propio, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6967126

PREVENTION

A natural-based repellant can be used as an additive for the drinking water. This does not cause the mites to die off, but prevents the mites from sucking blood and thus interrupts the reproductive cycle.

Alternatively, a Fluralaner based solution can be used (e.g .: Exzolt (r) from MSD), which is also administered via the drinking water and actively kills the mites.

TREATMENT

The mites are typically controlled with acaricides in powder form (carbamates, pyrethroids, pyrethrum). Ivermectin has proven to be very effective.

The removal of the mites from roosters is more problematic. Here all hiding places must be thoroughly cleaned and treated with acaricides. Alternatively, a 2-component disinfectant based on peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide can be used.

An alternative to acaricides are silicate dust (kieselguhr). The mode of action is based on a drying effect on contact. Another option is to coat the underside of the perches with vegetable oil (basically all oils). Here the oil clogs the pores and suffocates all stages of the mites.


Mycoplasmosis

SYMPTOMS

The disease (mycoplasmosis) usually manifests itself as an initially dry, short sneeze that is expelled through the nostrils with the beak closed. With a progressive spread in the respiratory tract, clear discharge from the nostrils can also be seen in the form of a moist film towards the tip of the beak. This film is particularly noticeable when leftover food and litter stick around the openings.


infected bird

TREATMENT

A rehabilitation of the affected population is only possible by interrupting the chain of infection. Mycoplasma gallisepticum reacts to the antibiotic tylosin. The symptoms can thus be suppressed for a short time, but reinfection takes place promptly if the stall is full, as the bacterium outside the body in the environment (stall, exercise area) maintains its ability to infect for a limited time. The occurrence of symptoms facilitates infection by other economically important respiratory diseases such as B. Infectious Bronchitis (IB) and Avian Rhinotracheitis (ART).


Marek’s Disease

SYMPTOMS

The incubation period is 20 to 160 days. Marek’s disease is very variable in its clinical picture.

In the classic form, the colonization of the nerves dominates and paralysis occurs in animals aged between 12 and 16 weeks. It occurs sporadically and the mortality is below 10%.

The acute form is epidemic in chicks up to the 8th week of life and leads to deaths especially in 18–22 week old animals. There can also be late deaths at the beginning of the first laying period. The mortality rate is up to 50%. The acute form shows up in bumps in the skin that lead to rough skin, as well as lymphomas in the bowels.

PREVENTION

Vaccination on the first day of life.

A treatment is not possible, which is why control focuses on prevention. It takes place through veterinary hygiene measures. Vaccination on the first day of life is possible, but is only carried out in breeding animals and laying hens. The breeding of resistant chickens is also being tried.


Newcastle disease

SYMPTOMS

The clinical picture of Newcastle disease initially shows numerous unspecific changes in the behavior and appearance of the animals, as they also occur with other acute infections:

  • Drastic drop in egg production and thin-shelled to shell-less eggs
  • high fever of up to 43 ° C
  • Apathy and loss of appetite
  • Watery, possibly bloody diarrhea
  • shortness of breath; The beak and eyes are covered with thick mucus
  • Circulatory disorders, often with dark crest discoloration
  • high mortality within five days of the onset of the symptoms
  • The incubation period is four to six days. If it spreads rapidly within the herd, deaths can also occur without any previously recognizable symptoms.

The viruses attack the lungs, intestines and central nervous system and can, among other things, cause punctiform bleeding on the lining of the stomach, especially around the ducts of the gastric glands.

In rare cases, inflammation of the conjunctiva of the eye can occur in people who are in close contact with sick animals.

PREVENTION

Regular vaccination against Newcastle disease for every flock of chickens and turkeys. The vaccination is usually done through the drinking water.

TREATMENT

Infected animals must be killed immediately. Affected stables, buildings and transport vehicles must be disinfected. Additional restrictions on people and traffic may be imposed on the keeping of animals.


Ornithosis

SYMPTOMS

This severe, flu-like general illness usually progresses with predominant involvement of the lungs (bronchopneumonia).

TREATMENT

As a rule, antibiotic therapy with tetracyclines (such as tetracycline, doxycycline) or macrolides (such as clarithromycin, erythromycin) takes two to three weeks.


Erysipelas

SYMPTOMS

In turkeys, Erysipelas occurs suddenly with isolated deaths, feed consumption decreases, and the roosters in particular become sleepy.

The droppings are yellowish to green-white, the bare scalp is bright red to purple, the forehead or neck bulges on the roosters are cyanotic and swollen. In chickens, ducks, pheasants and quails, the main symptoms are general weakness, diarrhea and sudden death.

PREVENTION

Preventive vaccination

TREATMENT

Erysipelas treatment is still successful with simple penicillin preparations and antipyretic agents. A three-day treatment leads to clinical healing.


Salmonellosis

SYMPTOMS

Salmonellosis in chickens: S. gallinarum is adapted to chickens, but can also occur in turkeys and some other bird species. This serovar occurs in 2 biovars: Biovar pullorum is responsible for the white chick dysentery or pullorum disease and leads to acute septicemic infections in chicks up to the 3rd to 6th week of life. The Biovar Gallinarum is the cause of so-called chicken typhus, which occurs mainly in older chickens. Infections with non-adapted types usually do not cause disease in chickens, but latent infections.

PREVENTION

Vaccination of all those who are still healthy with a live vaccine.

TREATMENT

  • Eliminate all sick animals
  • Treatment of the population with antibiotics

Tuberculosis

SYMPTOMS

As in cattle and humans, the various organ systems in birds are affected.

TREATMENT

Treatment of animals must not be carried out because the risk of infection for humans during or after the treatment due to resistant germs or chronically germ-releasing animals. In humans, special antibiotics must be used intensively over a long period of time.


Vitamin B deficiency

SYMPTOMS

Neurological disorders, symptoms of paralysis, convulsions;

PREVENTION

  • Vitamin supplements
  • Food additives

TREATMENT

  • Vitamin supplements
  • Food additives

Worm Infestation

SYMPTOMS

Chickens and turkeys are very susceptible to parasitic worms. These include the tracheal worms, the tapeworms and the roundworms. While not all types of worms are harmful to the health system, some can lead to weight loss, poor egg production, and even death.

PREVENTION

Regularly deworming

TREATMENT

The use of drugs to combat worms (anthelmintics) is particularly important in the field of veterinary medicine. The most important class of substances at the moment are the benzimidazoles, the most widely used representatives of which, in addition to flubendazole, are primarily fenbendazole and mebendazole. Also frequently used groups of active substances are tetrahydropyrimidines (here especially the pyrantel) and imidazothiazoles (especially levamisole). Ivermectins (e.g. moxidectin, doramectin, milbemycin) are considered to be a relatively new group of active ingredients. Older anthelmintics such as piperazine or organic phosphoric acid esters such as dichlorvos only play a subordinate role.



Geflügelkrankheiten


Aviäre Influenza (Geflügelpest)

SYMPTOME

Die akute Form der Geflügelpest äußert sich in Zeichen allgemeiner Schwäche (Apathie, Inappetenz, stumpfes, struppiges Federkleid), hohem Fieber, erschwerter Atmung mit geöffnetem Schnabel, Ödemen an Kopf, Hals, Kamm, Kehllappen, Beinen und Füßen, Blauverfärbung der Haut und der Schleimhäute, wässerig-schleimigem und grünlichem Durchfall und neurologischen Störungen (sonderbare Haltung des Kopfes, Störungen der Motorik).

Bei chronischem Verlauf sinkt die Legeleistung, die Eier sind dünnwandig oder schalenlos.

Die Mortalität ist abhängig vom Alter der Tiere und der Virulenz des Erregers. Bei hochvirulenten Erregern endet die Krankheit bei nahezu allen Tieren tödlich. Mehr als 15 % einer Geflügelherde können sterben, bevor Symptome auftreten (perakuter Verlauf).

VORBEUGUNG

Grundsätzlich können die Tiere auch durch eine vorbeugende Impfung wirksam gegen Geflügelpest geschützt werden. Ein Lebendimpfstoff auf Basis gering pathogener Erreger scheidet jedoch nach heutigem Stand des Wissens wegen des Mutationsrisikos aus. Eine Immunisierung mit inaktivierten Influenzaviren ist unter den Fachleuten aber ebenfalls umstritten, da kein bisher verfügbarer Impfstoff eine spätere Infektion, die nachfolgende Virusvermehrung und das Ausscheiden pathogener Viren verhindert; verhindert wird vielmehr nur die klinische Erkrankung der geimpften Tiere. So können geimpfte Tiere zu Virusträgern werden und pathogene Viren weiterverbreiten. Ein weiteres Problem ist die sichere (mikrobiologische/serologische) Unterscheidung der geimpften Tiere von erkrankten oder ansteckenden Tieren.

BEHANDLUNG

Bei Ausbrüchen der Geflügelpest in der Tierhaltung wird der gesamte Tierbestand der betroffenen Halter getötet. Die Kadaver werden verbrannt oder auf andere Weise unschädlich gemacht, um eine Übertragung auf andere Tierbestände zu verhindern.


Ballenabszess (Plantar Pododermatitis/Bumble foot)

SYMPTOME

Unter einem Ballenabszess versteht man eine nicht zu unterschätzende Infektion des Fußes (insbesondere an den Ballen), die durch verschiedene Ursachen hervorgerufen werden
kann. Ein Ballenabszess kann unbehandelt durchaus zum Tod eines Tieres führen. An der verletzten Stelle des Fußes dringen Bakterien (z.B. Staphylokokken) in die Haut ein und führen zu einem eitrigen Abszess. Sollte ein Ballenabszess unbehandelt bleiben, ist es sehr wahrscheinlich, dass sich die verkapselte Infektion am Hühnerfuß zuerst auf Sehnen, Muskeln sowie Gelenke und schließlich auch auf den gesamten Organismus ausbreitet. Dann wird es für das Tier lebensbedrohlich, weshalb eine Früherkennung wichtig und eine sofortige Behandlung nötig ist.

VORBEUGUNG

Ein Ballenabszess kann durch regelmäßige Kontrolle der Füße frühzeitig erkannt werden, andernfalls zeigt er sich später durch leichte oder mittelschwere Lahmheit des Tieres (Schonung des betroffenen Fußes). Der Ballenabszess äußert sich anfänglich durch Rötung, Schwellung, Schorf oder einen schwarzen Punkt als „Eintrittsstelle“.

Eine gute Prophylaxe stellen sauber geschliffene, nicht splitternde Sitzstangen sowie feine, weiche Einstreu (z.B. Hanfstreu) dar. Ebenfalls trägt eine ausgewogene, vitaminreiche Fütterung mit Legemehl, Körnern, frischem Obst, Gemüse, Mineralstoffen und Vitaminen zur Vorbeugung
bei. Darüber hinaus ist ein regelmäßiger Wechsel der Einstreu wichtig.

BEHANDLUNG

In erster Linie empfiehlt sich bei einem Ballenabszess stets die Konsultation eines geflügelkundigen Tierarztes. Meist muss neben der Behandlung (Ausräumen des eitrigen Materials und Wundversorgung) ein Antibiotikum verabreicht werden, welches nur ein Tierarzt verordnen darf.
Wichtig zu wissen: Die Haut des Tieres ist am Fuß sehr dick und ledrig und die Konsistenz des Eiters anders als beim Menschen extrem dickflüssig (ähnlich wie Zahnpasta) Will man als erfahrener Geflügelbesitzer sein Tier nach dem Ausräumen des eitrigen Materials durch den Tierarzt selber behandeln, muss der betroffene Fuß des Tieres zunächst in lauwarmem Wasser mit Betaisodona-Lösung® gebadet werden. Hilfreich ist es dabei, das Tier während der Behandlung in ein Tuch zu hüllen, damit es nichts sehen, aber dennoch gut atmen kann. Zunächst muss die Wunde mit Betaisodona-Lösung® o.ä. gespült werden. Danach sollte eine antiseptische Salbe (z.B. Betaisodona-Salbe®) in Kombination mit Bepanthen Creme® zur Wundheilung auf die Wunde aufgetragen werden (Bitte niemals Salbe mit einem Lokalanästhetikum, wie z.B. Benzocain, Lidocain o.ä., da diese für Geflügel giftig ist, und zum Tod führen kann).
Im Anschluss sollte die Wunde steril abgedeckt und locker mit steriler, elastischer Mullbinde verbunden werden. Als Zwischenlage empfiehlt sich eine Polsterung aus weicher Watte zur Druckentlastung beim Laufen. Gegen Schmutz und Feuchtigkeit schützt dann abschließend ein
selbsthaftender Verband (blau oder grün – bitte nicht rot, da die Artgenossen sich von der roten Farbe zum Picken animiert fühlen) sowie unter dem Verband an der Fußsohle eine Schicht Isolierband zum Schutz vor Feuchtigkeit. Eine Wundkontrolle / Verbanderneuerung empfiehlt sich alle 2 Tage bis zur völligen Ausheilung. Das kann mitunter auch 6-8 Wochen dauern, da die Haut an den Füßen nur langsam
heilt und jederzeit wieder Keime in die Haut eindringen können.


Geflügelcholera

SYMPTOME

Die Geflügelcholera kann in zwei Formen auftreten.

• Die perakute/akute Form ist durch eine Septikämie gekennzeichnet, die bei perakutem Verlauf in plötzlichen Todesfällen, bei akutem Mattigkeit, sinkender Futteraufnahme, Blauverfärbungen, Atemnot und blutigem Nasenausfluss und Durchfall gekennzeichnet ist. Die Morbidität in Beständen beträgt bis zu 50 %.

• Die chronische Form äußert sich in Schnupfen, Entzündungen der Kopfanhänge (Kamm, Kehllappen – „Läppchenkrankheit“), Gelenkentzündungen, Lähmungen, Torticollis, Gleichgewichtsstörungen und eventuell Durchfall.

VORBEUGUNG

Die Behandlung erkrankter Tiere ist meist erfolglos. Die Therapie zielt daher auf einer vorbeugenden Antibiose gefährdeter Kontakttiere (Metaphylaxe). Hierbei werden Sulfonamide oder Fluorchinolone eingesetzt. Auch Penicilline sind wirksam.

BEHANDLUNG

Eine Behandlung erkrankter Tiere ist meist erfolglos (siehe Vorbeugung).


Geflügelschnupfen

SYMPTOME

• Entzündete Augen
• Nasenausfluss
• röchelnde Atemgeräusche

VORBEUGUNG

• Stallhygene
• Desinfektion von Futterautomaten und Tränken
• Vermeidung von Zugluft im Stall
• Vitaminpräparate


Geflügelpocken

SYMPTOME

Nach der zweiten Virämie kann sich die Erkrankung in verschiedenen Formen äußern:

• Die Hautform ist durch papulöse Veränderungen vor allem in unbefiederten Regionen, um das Auge herum, am Schnabelansatz, am Kamm und an den Ständern gekennzeichnet. Die Papeln trocknen ein, färben sich gelblich und später bräunlich und fallen dann ab. Bei mildem Verlauf treten im Anschluss daran häufig gutartige Hauttumoren auf.
• Die diphtheroide Form ist durch fibrinöse Beläge an den Schleimhäuten in der Schnabel-Rachenhöhle (Oropharynx) und am Kehlkopf. Die diphtheroide Form kann mit Hauterscheinungen kombiniert sein.
• Die septikämische Form zeigt sich in Allgemeinstörungen wie Abgeschlagenheit, Fressunlust und Zyanosen. Sie endet meist tödlich, ohne das typische pockenartige Effloreszenzen auftreten.

VORBEUGUNG

Zur Prophylaxe kann ein Lebendimpfstoff eingesetzt werden. Dieser wird vor allem bei Ausbrüchen der Vogelpocken an noch nicht infizierte Tiere verabreicht. Ziervögel sollten zumindest in größeren Beständen zum Schutz vor Kanarienpocken geimpft werden. Der Impfstoff wird intramuskulär oder durch Durchstechen der Flughaut (wing-web-Methode) verabreicht.

BEHANDLUNG

Eine Therapie ist nicht möglich.


Gicht

SYMPTOME

Gelenksschwellungen und Entzündungen durch Ablagerung von Harnsäure in den Gelenken und Organen. Daraus resultieren verminderte Bewegungsfreude, Abmagerung und ein schlechter Allgemeinzustand.

VORBEUGUNG

• Artgerechte Ernährung
• Vermeidung von Überfütterung


Histomoniasis (Schwarzkopfkrankheit)

SYMPTOME

Insbesondere bei Truthähnen führt die Histomoniasis zu einem schweren Krankheitsverlauf, wobei Blinddarm und Leber des Wirts stark geschädigt werden.

Die Morbidität und Mortalität bei infizierten Vögeln ist extrem hoch. Die typischen Symptome der Histomoniasis sind eher unspezifisch und infizierte Tiere zeigen ein apathisches Verhalten, geschlossene Augen, einen gestelzten Gang sowie Atembeschwerden. Bei Truthähnen ist das Auftreten von schwefelgelbem Kot infolge einer Leberschädigung am auffälligsten, bei Hühnern kommt es jedoch meist nur zu einem schleimigen Durchfall. Läsionen der Leber treten hingegen nicht auf.

Sicher diagnostiziert werden kann die Histomoniasis jedoch erst nach dem Tod. Bei Truthähnen verursacht die Histomoniasis sichtbare, nekrotische Läsionen in der Leber. Darüber hinaus kommt es im Blinddarm von infizierten Vögeln zu einer schweren, ulzerativen Entzündung, welche mit einer charakteristischen Verdickung der Darmschleimhaut einhergeht. Junge Tiere sterben in der Regel wenige Tage nach Ausbruch der Krankheit, bei älteren ist oft ein chronischer Verlauf zu beobachten. Den Namen hat die Krankheit von einer blauroten bis schwarzen Verfärbung der Kopfhaut, welche aber nicht immer auftritt. Da das Auftreten von schwarzen Kämmen aber kein primäres Erkennungsmerkmal der Histomoniasis ist, wird die Bezeichnung Schwarzkopfkrankheit manchmal auch als Fehlbezeichnung angesehen. Mitunter können auch andere Organe von der Histomoniasis befallen werden.


Gesunde und geschädigte Leber
(Foto: Michael Sagarese)

Schwefelgelber Kot
(Foto: Michael Sagarese)

Lethargisches Jungtier mir gesträubten Federn

VORBEUGUNG

Prophylaktisch wirkt eine regelmäßige Entwurmung der Tiere.

BEHANDLUNG

Seit der Identifizierung des Erregers der Histomoniasis wurden eine Vielzahl von Stoffen im Laufe der Zeit untersucht.

Verschiedene pentavalente Arsenverbindungen, wie beispielsweise Nitarson oder Carbason erwiesen sich dabei als wirksam im prophylaktischen Einsatz. In der Europäischen Union sind sie für lebensmittelliefernden Tiere nicht mehr zugelassen. In den USA hingegen wird Nitarson (4-Nitrophenylarsensäure) noch angewendet.

Auch das vorbeugend wirkende Nifursol ist heute, genauso wie andere Nitrofurane, nicht mehr zugelassen; die Zulassung von Nifursol wurde zum 1. April 2003 EU-weit widerrufen.

Weitere Wirkstoffe gegen die Krankheit sind Ronidazol und Dimetridazol, welche in der Europäischen Union für Hühnervögel ebenfalls nicht mehr zugelassen sind.


Infektiöse Bronchitis

SYMPTOME

Die Übertragung erfolgt vor allem als Tröpfcheninfektion, wobei mit Viren beladene Staubkörner und Tröpfchen weite Entfernungen zurücklegen können. Das Virus besiedelt das Flimmerepithel der Atemwege, aber auch die Eileiter können befallen werden. Die IB breitet sich rasch in einem Bestand aus, vor allem Jungtiere zeigen eine hohe Erkrankungshäufigkeit. Die Verluste können bis zu 25 % betragen.

Die Inkubationszeit beträgt 18 bis 36 Stunden. Klinisch treten Atemnot, Nasenausfluss, röchelnde Atemgeräusche und Bindehautentzündung auf. Zudem sind Allgemeinstörungen mit Fressunlust zu beobachten. Eileiterinfektionen führen später zu Legestörungen wie dünnschalige Eier, Windeier, verminderte oder vollständig fehlende Legetätigkeit („falsche Leger“) und verminderte Schlupfrate.

VORBEUGUNG

Impfung ab der dritten Lebenswoche.

BEHANDLUNG

Die schnelle Ausbreitung im Bestand und die klinischen Erscheinungen erlauben eine Verdachtsdiagnose. Die Diagnose kann durch pathologische Untersuchung verendeter Vögel sowie mit serologischen und virologischen Nachweisverfahren erfolgen. Differentialdiagnostisch sind Mykoplasmose, Infektiöse Laryngotracheitis, Hühnerschnupfen und Newcastle-Krankheit, aber auch nichtinfektiöse Erkrankungen (Fütterungsfehler) abzugrenzen.

Eine Behandlung ist allenfalls symptomatisch möglich. Die Bekämpfung basiert daher vor allem auf der Impfung, die ab der dritten Lebenswoche erfolgen kann. In gefährdeten Gebieten ist sie alle drei bis vier Monate zu wiederholen.


Infektiöse Kehlkopf-Luftröhren Entzündung

SYMPTOME

Der Erreger verursacht eine milde bis schwere Entzündung der oberen Luftwege, hauptsächlich des Kehlkopfs (Larynx) und der Luftröhre (Trachea). Die Erkrankung tritt vor allem im Herbst und im Winter auf.

Klinisch äußert sie sich in Husten, Keuchen und Atemnot, wo bei die Tiere einen blutig-gefärbten Schleim auswürgen können. Milde Verlaufsformen durch weniger virulente Virusstämme zeigen sich in einer Sinusitis und Konjunktivitis.

Pathologisch-anatomisch zeigt sich eine Blutstauung und Hyperämie von Kehlkopf und Luftröhre, bei schwerem Verlauf können käsige, diphtheroide Beläge oder Pseudomembranen auftreten, ähnlich der diphteroiden Form der Vogelpocken. In den Epithelzellen lassen sich pathohistologisch intranukleäre Einschlusskörperchen nachweisen.

VORBEUGUNG

siehe Behandlung

BEHANDLUNG

Die Bekämpfung basiert auf strengen Hygienemaßnahmen in Geflügelbeständen zur Verhinderung der Einschleppung. Eine Impfung mit Lebendimpfstoffen ist möglich, verhindert aber nicht latente Infektionen oder deren Aufflammen.

In Deutschland zählt die Infektiöse Laryngotracheitis zu den meldepflichtigen Tierkrankheiten. Auch in Österreich unterliegt sie der Meldepflicht.


Kokzidiose (Rote Ruhr)

SYMPTOME

Die Rote Kükenruhr geht mit blutigen Durchfällen einher und kann bei Küken eine Mortalitätsrate von 80 % erreichen.

VORBEUGUNG

Vorbeugend können Hygiene und Desinfektionsmaßnahmen eingesetzt werden. Bereits kochendes Wasser ist zur Inaktivierung der Oozysten ausreichend. Ein zu hohe Besatzdichte ist zu vermeiden, Wechselausläufe sind empfehlenswert. Bei einem Ausbruch sollten Erdboden bzw. Einstreu abgetragen werden. Wirksame Desinfektionsmittel sind z. B. Kresole. Hühner können prophylaktisch mit einem Kokzidiostatikum behandelt werden. Auch eine Schutzimpfung einwöchiger Küken über das Trinkwasser (Paracox 8®) ist ebenfalls wirksam.

BEHANDLUNG

Die Behandlung erfolgt durch Kokzidienwirksame Medikamente wie Sulfonamide wie Sulfachlorpyrazin oder Sulfadimidin. Darüber hinaus sind Toltrazuril und Clazuril wirksam. Bei der Roten Kükenruhr ist Amprolium sehr gut wirksam. Unterstützend wird die Gabe von Multivitaminpräparaten empfohlen.


Luftröhrenwürmer

SYMPTOME

• Pfeifende oder röchelnde Atemgeräusche
• Entzündungen, Schwellungen sowie kleine Knötchen an den Anheftungsstellen, starke Schleimbildung
• Mäßige Anämie
• Tod durch Erschöpfung oder Asphyxie

VORBEUGUNG

Trockene Umgebung (Verhinderung der Bildung der infektionsfähigen Larve III)

BEHANDLUNG

Flubendazol (keine Wartezeit auf Gewebe und Eier)


Legenot

SYMPTOME

Ein Vogelweibchen, welches von Legenot betroffen ist, erkennt man anfangs an scheiternden Legeversuchen. Es versucht das Ei durch starkes Pressen auszuscheiden. Dabei werden relativ große und dünne Kotballen ausgeschieden, welche oftmals mit Blut vermischt sind. Betroffene Weibchen wirken nervös und ruhelos, sie wechseln häufig den Sitzplatz, sitzen mit stark gespreizten Beinen auf den Sitzstangen oder Wippen mit dem Schwanz. Durch Druck auf Nervengeflechte kann es zu Lähmungserscheinungen kommen.

In einem späteren Stadium sitzen betroffene Weibchen völlig entkräftet auf dem Boden. Oftmals kann beim Betasten des Unterleibs eine leichte Wölbung festgestellt werden.

Wenn nicht reagiert wird, fällt das Weibchen in einen Schockzustand und verendet. Unter Umständen kann es durch das starke Pressen zu einem Kloakenvorfall kommen.

BEHANDLUNG

Im Anfangsstadium hilft eine Erhöhung der Luftfeuchtigkeit und eine Wärmebestrahlung. Weiterhin kann mit Hilfe von Rizinusöl (oder ähnlichem), welches in die Kloake geträufelt wird, versucht werden, das Ei zu lösen. Auch eine Bauchmassage (sollte allerdings nur bei größeren Vögeln angewendet werden, da bei kleinen Vögeln das Ei in der Kloake brechen kann) in Verbindung mit den Pressversuchen des Weibchens kann helfen. Wenn nach maximal zwei Stunden kein Erfolg erzielt ist, muss umgehend ein Tierarzt verständigt werden. Dieser kann versuchen das Ei manuell aus der Kloake zu drücken, sollte dies scheitern kann das Hormon Oxytocin verabreicht werden.


Milben (Rote Vogelmilbe)

SYMPTOME

Die Schadwirkung der Roten Vogelmilbe besteht im Saugen von Blut, Auslösen von Juckreiz und Entzündungen und dem damit verbundenen Stress der befallenen Tiere. Küken und Jungvögel können durch die ständige Blutabnahme schon bei mäßigem Befall sterben. Auch bei brütenden Vögeln sind direkte Todesfälle möglich.

Erkrankte Vögel kratzen sich ständig gereizt das Gefieder. An den Bissstellen kommt es zu Entzündungen und lang anhaltendem Juckreiz. Besonders gut sichtbar ist der Milbenbefall an den Beinen der Vögel. Im Extremfall ist die Haut hier stark angeschwollen, verkrustet und schuppig. Einzelne Hautpartien lösen sich nach und nach ab.


Rote Vogelmilbe
De AW – Trabajo propio, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6967126

VORBEUGUNG

Als Tränkwasserzusatz kann in ein Repellent auf natürlicher Basis eingesetzt werden. Dieser führt nicht zum Absterben der Milben, hindert aber die Milben daran Blut zu saugen und unterbricht damit den Reproduktionszyklus.

Alternativ kann auch eine Fluralaner Lösung verwendet werden (z.B.: Exzolt(r) von MSD), welche ebenfalls über das Trinkwasser verabreicht wird und aktiv die Milben abtötet.

BEHANDLUNG

Die Bekämpfung der Tiere erfolgt typischerweise mit Akariziden in Pulverform (Carbamate, Pyrethroide, Pyrethrum). Als gut wirksam hat sich Ivermectin erwiesen.

Problematischer ist die Entfernung der Milben aus Stallanlagen. Hier müssen alle Schlupfwinkel gründlich gereinigt und mit Akariziden behandelt werden. Alternativ kann ein 2-Komponenten-Desinfektionsmittel auf Basis von Peroxyessigsäure und Wasserstoffperoxid eingesetzt werden.

Eine Alternative zu Akariziden sind Silikatstaube (Kieselgur). Die Wirkungsweise beruht auf einem austrocknenden Effekt bei Kontakt. Eine weitere Möglichkeit ist das Bestreichen der Unterseite der Sitzstangen mit Pflanzenöl (grundsätzlich alle Öle). Hierbei verstopft das Öl die Poren und alle Stadien der Milben ersticken.


Mykoplasmose

SYMPTOME

Die Erkrankung (Mykoplasmose) äußert sich in der Regel durch zunächst trockenes kurzes Niesen, das durch die Nasenlöcher bei geschlossenem Schnabel ausgestoßen wird. Bei einer fortschreitenden Ausbreitung im Respirationstrakt ist auch klarer Ausfluss aus den Nasenöffnungen in Form eines feuchten Films hin zur Schnabelspitze erkennbar. Dieser Film wird besonders dann auffällig, wenn Futterreste und Einstreu um die Öffnungen kleben.

Bei Puten sind die Symptome z. T. ähnlich und werden als infektiöse Sinusitis bezeichnet, es wurden aber auch Veränderungen in Gelenken und somit Motorik beschrieben.


Geschwollene Atemwege und auslaufendes Sekret

BEHANDLUNG

Eine Sanierung des betroffenen Bestandes ist nur über die Unterbrechung der Infektionskette durch eine ausreichend lange Ausstallung möglich. Mycoplasma gallisepticum reagiert auf das Antibiotikum Tylosin. Die Symptome können damit kurzfristig zurückgedrängt werden, die Reinfektion erfolgt aber bei durchgehendem Stallbesatz prompt, da das Bakterium außerhalb des Körpers in der Umwelt (Stall, Auslauf) eine beschränkte Zeit seine Infektionsfähigkeit erhält. Ein Auftreten von Symptomen erleichtert die Infektion durch weitere wirtschaftlich bedeutende Atemwegserkrankungen wie z. B. Infektiöse Bronchitis (IB) und Aviäre Rhinotracheitis (ART).


Mareksche Krankheit

SYMPTOME

Die Inkubationszeit beträgt 20 bis 160 Tage. Die Marek-Krankheit ist in ihrem Bild sehr variabel.

Bei der klassischen Form dominiert die Besiedlung der Nerven und es kommt zu Lähmungen bei 12 bis 16 Wochen alten Tieren. Sie tritt sporadisch auf und die Mortalität liegt unter 10 %.

Die akute Form tritt seuchenhaft bei Küken bis zur 8. Lebenswoche auf und führt zu Todesfällen vor allem bei 18–22 Wochen alten Tieren. Es kann auch noch zu späten Todesfällen zu Beginn der ersten Legeperiode kommen. Die Mortalitätsrate beträgt bis zu 50 %. Die akute Form zeigt sich in Hauterhebungen, die zu einer rauen Haut führen, sowie Lymphomen in den Eingeweiden.

VORBEUGUNG

Schutzimpfung am ersten Lebenstag.

Eine Therapie ist nicht möglich, weshalb sich die Bekämpfung auf die Vorbeugung konzentriert. Sie erfolgt durch veterinärhygienische Maßnahmen. Eine Schutzimpfung am ersten Lebenstag ist möglich, wird aber nur bei Zuchttieren und Legehennen durchgeführt. Auch die Züchtung resistenter Hühner wird versucht.

In Deutschland zählt die Mareksche-Krankheit zu den meldepflichtigen Tierkrankheiten. Auch in Österreich unterliegt sie der Meldepflicht.


Mutterkornvergiftung

SYMPTOME

Zu den toxischen Effekten von Mutterkornalkaloiden zählen Darmkrämpfe, Halluzinationen sowie das Absterben von Zehen aufgrund von Durchblutungsstörungen, die das Krankheitsbild Ergotismus (auch Antoniusfeuer oder Mutterkornbrand) prägen. Bereits 5 Gramm frisches Mutterkorn können tödlich sein.

BEHANDLUNG

Keine Behandlung möglich.


Newcastle Krankheit (Atypische Geflügelpest)

SYMPTOME

Das Krankheitsbild der Newcastle-Krankheit weist zunächst zahlreiche unspezifische Veränderungen in Verhalten und Erscheinungsbild der Tiere auf, wie sie auch bei anderen akuten Infektionen auftreten:

• drastischer Rückgang der Legeleistung und dünnschalige bis schalenlose Eier
• hohes Fieber bis 43 °C
• Apathie und Appetitlosigkeit
• wässriger, eventuell blutiger Durchfall
• Atemnot; Schnabel und Augen sind mit zähem Schleim bedeckt
• Durchblutungsstörungen, häufig mit dunkler Kamm-Verfärbung
• hohe Sterblichkeit binnen fünf Tagen nach Auftreten der Symptome
• Die Inkubationszeit beträgt vier bis sechs Tage. Bei rascher Ausbreitung innerhalb des Bestands können Todesfälle auch ohne vorher erkennbare Symptome auftreten.

Die Viren befallen Lunge, Darm und Zentralnervensystem und können u. a. punktförmige Blutungen auf der Magenschleimhaut, insbesondere um die Ausführungsgänge der Magendrüsen, verursachen.

In seltenen Fällen kann bei Menschen, die in engem Kontakt mit erkrankten Tieren stehen, eine Entzündung der Bindehaut des Auges auftreten.

VORBEUGUNG

In Deutschland schreibt die Geflügelpest-Verordnung eine regelmäßige Impfung gegen die Newcastle-Krankheit für jeden Hühner- und Truthühnerbestand vor. Dies gilt auch für Privatleute, die nur wenige Hühner halten. Die Impfung erfolgt in der Regel über das Trinkwasser.

Hühner oder Truthühner dürfen in Deutschland nur dann von einem Geflügelbestand in einen anderen abgegeben oder auf Geflügelmärkten, Geflügelschauen und ähnlichen Veranstaltungen ausgestellt werden, wenn sie von einer tierärztlichen Bescheinigung begleitet sind, aus der hervorgeht, dass der Herkunftsbestand der Tiere (im Falle von Eintagsküken der Elterntierbestand) regelmäßig gegen die Newcastle-Krankheit geimpft wurde.

BEHANDLUNG

Stellt ein Veterinäramt die Newcastle-Krankheit fest, wird in der Regel ein Sperrgebiet für Geflügel in einem Radius von mindestens drei Kilometern eingerichtet. Das Geflügel in diesem Gebiet muss zum Schutz vor einer Ausbreitung der Seuche auf Anweisung des Veterinäramtes drei Wochen lang im Stall bleiben. Züchter müssen ihre Bestände melden. Zudem kann auch ein Beobachtungsgebiet von mindestens doppelt so großem Radius eingerichtet werden. Infizierte Tiere müssen sofort getötet werden. Betroffene Ställe, Gebäude und Transportfahrzeuge werden desinfiziert. Den Tierhaltungen werden gegebenenfalls zusätzliche Personen- und Verkehrsbeschränkungen auferlegt.


Ornithose

SYMPTOME

Diese schwere, grippeartige Allgemeinerkrankung verläuft in der Regel unter vorwiegender Beteiligung der Lungen (Bronchopneumonie) ab. 

BEHANDLUNG

In der Regel erfolgt eine Antibiotika-Therapie mit Tetracyclinen (etwa Tetracyclin, Doxycyclin) oder Makroliden (etwa Clarithromycin, Erythromycin) über zwei bis drei Wochen.


Räude

SYMPTOME

Es entstehen schwammartig poröse, kalkgrau, weiß oder gelblich gefärbte Hornhautwucherungen. Die Veränderungen durch K. mutans sind auf die Haut der Hintergliedmaßen beschränkt. Hyperkeratosen durch K. pilae treten typischerweise an Schnabel und Augenregion, aber auch in anderen, bei der Körperpflege vom Schnabel berührten Bereichen (Bürzeldrüse, Kloakenumgebung, Flügelspitzen), auf.

VORBEUGUNG

Neue Tiere sollten gründlich auf bereits vorhandene typische Hautveränderungen untersucht und gegebenenfalls prophylaktisch therapiert werden.

BEHANDLUNG

Betroffene Vögel sowie Kontakttiere werden mit Ivermectin (Spot-on oder systemisch) behandelt. Zum Entfernen der Hyperkeratosen wird 5%ige Salicylsäurelösung lokal aufgetragen.
Bei schon starker Krustenbildung sollte ein vorheriges Aufweichen mit Seife oder Glyzerin erfolgen, damit das Präparat die Milben erreichen und wirken kann.


Rotlauf

SYMPTOME

Bei Puten tritt der Rotlauf plötzlich mit einzelnen Todesfällen auf, die Futteraufnahme sinkt, besonders die Hähne werden schläfrig.

Der Kot ist gelblich bis grünweiß, die nackte Kopfhaut leuchtend rot bis violett, bei den Hähnen sind Stirn- oder Nackenwulst zyanotisch und geschwollen. Bei Hühnern, Enten, Fasanen und Wachteln bestehen die wesentlichen Symptome in allgemeiner Schwäche, Diarrhöe und plötzlichen Todesfällen.

VORBEUGUNG

Vorbeugende Impfung;

BEHANDLUNG

Nach wie vor gelingt die Behandlung von Rotlauf mit einfachen Penicillin – Präparaten und
fiebersenkenden Mitteln. Eine dreitägige Behandlung führt zu klinischer Ausheilung. 


Salmonellose

SYMPTOME

Salmonellosen beim Huhn: S. Gallinarum ist an Hühner angepasst, kann aber auch bei Puten und einigen anderen Vogelarten auftreten. Dieses Serovar tritt in 2 Biovaren auf: Biovar Pullorum ist verantwortlich für die weiße Kükenruhr bzw. Pullorumseuche und führt zu akuten septikämischen Infektionen bei Küken bis zur 3. bis 6. Lebenswoche. Das Biovar Gallinarum ist der Verursacher des sogenannten Hühnertyphus, der vor allem bei älteren Hühnern auftritt. Infektionen mit nicht adaptierten Typen verursachen beim Huhn üblicherweise keine Erkrankung, sondern latente Infektionen.

VORBEUGUNG

Impfung aller noch Gesunden mit einem Lebendimpfstoff.

BEHANDLUNG

• Ausmerzen aller kranken und kümmernden Tiere
• Bestandsbehandlung mit Antibiotika


Tuberkulose

SYMPTOME

Wie auch beim Rind und beim Menschen werden die verschiedenen Organsysteme beim Vogel befallen.

BEHANDLUNG

Bei Tieren darf eine Behandlung   nicht durchgeführt werden, da eine Infektionsgefahr für den Menschen während oder nach der Behandlung durch resistente Keime oder chronisch keimausscheidende Tiere zu groß ist.
Beim Menschen muss über einen langen Zeitraum mit speziellen Antibiotika intensiv behandelt werden.


Vitamin B Mangel

SYMPTOME

Neurologische Störungen,Lähmungserscheinungen, Krämpfe;

VORBEUGUNG

Vitaminpräperate
Futterzusätze

BEHANDLUNG

Vitaminpräperate
Futterzusätze


Wurmbefall

SYMPTOME

Hühner und Puten sind sehr anfällig für die kontrahierenden, parasitären Würmer. Dazu gehören die Luftröhrenwürmer, die Bandwürmer und die Fadenwürmer. Obwohl nicht alle Arten der Würmer schädlich für das Gesundheitssystem sind, können andere zu Gewichtsverlust, einer schwachen Eierproduktion und sogar dem Tod führen.

VORBEUGUNG

Regelmäßig entwurmen;

BEHANDLUNG

Insbesondere im Bereich der Veterinärmedizin hat der Einsatz von Medikamenten zur Spulwurmbekämpfung (Anthelminthika) eine große Bedeutung. Die derzeit bedeutendste Stoffklasse sind die Benzimidazole, deren meistverwendete Vertreter neben Flubendazol vor allem Fenbendazol und Mebendazol sind. Ebenfalls häufig verwendete Wirkstoffgruppen sind Tetrahydropyrimidine (hier vor allem das Pyrantel) und Imidazothiazole (v. a. Levamisol). Als relativ neue Wirkstoffgruppe gelten Ivermectine (beispielsweise Moxidectin, Doramectin, Milbemycin). Ältere Anthelminthika wie Piperazin oder auch organische Phosphorsäureester wie Dichlorvos spielen nur noch eine untergeordnete Rolle.


Incubation

INCUBATORS

There are different types of incubators. Our values are referring to a model with air circulation fans.


EGG STORAGE

Depending on the length of the storage, there are different methods that increases hatchability.
For longer storage periods (>7 days), the eggs should be stored with the small end up, as this increases the hatchability. For short term storage, the small end down storing position is preferable.
The storage temperature should be between 10-13°C (50-55.4°F ).
Before putting the eggs into the incubator, they should be slowly brought to a temperature of 21°C (69.8°F). This should happen over a course of two days.


With increasing storage time, the hatchability decreases.

INCUBATION (28 days)

Day 1-25:    37,6°C (99.7°F) and 50% humidity
Tag 26-28:  37,3°C (99.15°F) and 65% humidity

To determine the optimal temperature, we recommend the usage of an infrared thermometer. The shell temperature should be measured on the side of the egg.


EGG TURNING

Turning the eggs in a frequent way, is mandatory to get the best results. In nature, a hen turns their eggs about 96 times a day. If your incubator doesn’t support such a high turning frequency, you should still use the highest available option.
Low turning frequencies are related to early embryo deaths and malformations.
Also the turning angle is of importance. The angle should be >45 degrees.

Two days before the poults hatch, the turning of the eggs should be stopped. The poults must bring themselves in the perfect hatching position.


EGG CANDLING:

On day 7. and 21. eggs should be „candled“. Eggs that are not developing should be removed from the incubator, to avoid the risk of infections.

left: no development – right: developing embryos (twins)


HATCHING

If you’ve done everything correctly, you’ll be rewarded. 🙂


EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT


Varieties

If you want to view a picture in full screen mode, right-click on the picture and open it in a new window.


GenotypeVarietyPhenotype Adults
bb ee (e-)Auburn
Bb
Bb’
Barred Black
Bb ee (e-)
Bb’ ee (e-)
Barred Chocolate
Bb Rr slsl Rr slsl
Bb’ Rr slsl Rr slsl
Barred Recessive Rusty Slate
Bb nn (n-)
Bb’ nn (n-)
Barred Silver-Tipped Black
Bb Dd
Bb’ Dd
Barred Slate
BBBlack
b’b’Black-Winged Bronze
b’b’ nn (n-) Black-Winged Narragansett
b’b’ nn (n-) Pnpn Black-Winged Narragansett (semi-pencilled)
b’b’ cgcg Dd nn (n-) Rr Blue Calico
b’b’ Ccg Dd Blue Cornish Palm
bb Dd nn (n-) Blue Narragansett
bb Dd Rr Blue Red Bronze
b’b’ Ccg Dd Rr Blue Red Cornish Palm
b’b’ cgcg Dd Blue Sweetgrass
b’b’ DDBlue-Winged Lilac
b’b’ Dd Rr Blue-Winged Red Bronze
bb nn (n-) rr Bourbon Buff
bb nn (n-) rr ee (e-) Bourbon Buff Brown
bb rr Bourbon Red
bb Dd rr Bourbon Red Slated
bb Bronze
b’b’ nn (n-) Rr ee (e-) Brown-Winged Golden Silver Auburn
b’b’ Ccg nn (n-) ee (e-) Brown-Winged Silver Auburn (semi-gray)
b’b’ nn (n-) ee (e-) Brown-Winged Narragansett
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) Rr Calico
BB ee (e-) Chocolate
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) ee (e-) Chocolate Palm
BB Dd ee (e-) Chocolate Slate
b’b’ cgcg ee (e-) Chocolate Sweetgrass
b’b’ Ccg Cornish Palm
b’b’ Ccg Pnpn Cornish Palm (semi-pencilled)
b’b’ rr ee (e-) Creme Tipped Buff
bb cgcg Dd nn (n-) Dark Blue
bb cgcg nn (n-) ee (e-) Dark Brown
bb cgcg nn (n-) Dark Gray
bb cgcg nn (n-) rr Dark Red
bb Dd nn (n-) Rr Dilute Blue Red Bronze
b’b’ Dd nn (n-) Rr Dilute Blue-Winged Red Bronze
bb DD nn (n-) Dilute Lilac
bb DD nn (n-) Rr Dilute Lilac Semi-Red
BB cgcg nn (n-) Rr
Bb cgcg nn (n-) Rr
Dilute Rusty Black
BB cgcg Dd nn (n-) Rr
Bb cgcg Dd nn (n-) Rr
Dilute Rusty Slate
b’b’ cgcg Rr Fall Fire
bb cgcg nn (n-) Rr Frosted Dark Gray
bb cgc nn (n-) Rr Frosted Oregon Gray
bb nn (n-) Rr Golden Narragansett
bb’ nn (n-) Rr Golden Narragansett (split b’)
b’b’ Ccg nn (n-) Rr Golden Phoenix
b’b’ Rr Harvest Gold
bb rr **Harvey Speckled*
BB rr Jersey Buff
Bb rr
Bb’ rr
Jersey Buff (split base color)
BB rr ee (e-) Jersey Buff Brown
BB DD Lavender
bb DD rr Lavender Edged Bourbon Red
b’b’ cgcg DD Rr Lavender Fall Fire
b’b’ cgcg DD nn (n-) Lavender Palm
b’b’ cgcg DD Lavender Sweetgrass
b’b’ nn (n-) rr Light Buff
b’b’ Ccg rr Light Red
bb DD Lilac
BB cgcg nn (n-) Marbled Black
BB cgcg Dd nn (n-) Marbled Slate
Bb’ cgcg nn (n-) Mottled Black
Bb’ cgcg nn (n-) ee (e-) Mottled Chocolate
Bb’ cgc nn (n-) ee (e-) Mottled Chocolate Dapple
Bb’ cgcg DD nn (n-) Mottled Lavender
Bb’ cgcg nn (n-) Rr Mottled Rusty Black
Bb’ cgcg Dd nn (n-) Mottled Slate
bb nn (n-) Narragansett
bb cgc Dd nn (n-) Oregon Blue
bb cgc nn (n-) ee (e-) Oregon Brown
bb cgc nn (n-) Oregon Gray
bb cgc nn (n-) rr Oregon Red
b’b’ nn (n-) pnpn Pencilled Black-Winged Narragansett
b’b’ cgcg Dd Rr pnpn Pencilled Blue Fall Fire
b’b’ cgcg Dd nn (n-) pnpn Pencilled Blue Palm
b’b’ cgcg Dd pnpn Pencilled Blue Sweetgrass
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) ee (e-) Pencilled Chocolate Palm
b’b’ cgcg Rr pnpn Pencilled Fall Fire
b’b’ cgcg DD Rr pnpn Pencilled Lavender Fall Fire
b’b’ cgcg DD pnpn Pencilled Lavender Sweetgrass
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) pnpn Pencilled Palm
b’b’ cgc nn (n-) pnpn Pencilled Palm Semi-White
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) rr pnpn Pencilled Red Palm
b’b’ cgcg rr pnpn Pencilled Red Sweetgrass
b’b’ cgcg pnpn Pencilled Sweetgrass
bb nn (n-) slsl Recessive Blue Narragansett
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) slsl Recessive Blue Palm
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) pnpn slsl Recessive Blue Pencilled Palm
b’b’ cgcg slsl Recessive Blue Sweetgrass
bb slsl Recessive Slate
bb rr slsl Recessive Slate Lilac
bb Rr ee (e-) Red Auburn
bb Rr Red Bronze
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) rr Red Palm
b’b’ Ccg Rr Pnpn Red Phoenix Semi-Pencilled
bb Rr slsl Red Recessive Slate
bb Dd Red Slate
b’b’ cgcg rr Red Sweetgrass
b’b’ rr Regal Red
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) Royal Palm
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) Pnpn Royal Palm Semi-Pencilled
b’b’ cgc nn (n-) Royal Palm Semi-White
BB Rr
Bb Rr
Rusty Black
BB Rr ee (e-)
Bb Rr ee (e-)
Rusty Brown
BB Rr ee (e-)
Bb Rr ee (e-)
Rusty Chocolate
BB cgc nn (n-) Rr
Bb cgc nn (n-) Rr
Rusty Dapple
Bb’ DD Rr Rusty Lavender
BB Dd Rr
Bb Dd Rr
Rusty Slate
Bb’ cgcg nn (n-) Rr Rusty Mottled Slate
b’b’ nn (n-) rr ee (e-) Self Buff
bb nn (n-) ee (e-) Silver Auburn
BB cgc nn (n-) Silver Dapple
BB nn (n-) Silver Tipped Black
BB Dd Slate
BB cgc Dd nn (n-) Slate Dapple
bb spspSpotted
b’b’ cgcg Sweetgrass
b’b’ Ccg Dd pnpn Tiger Blue
b’b’ Ccg pnpn Tiger Bronze
Bb’ cgcg RrTri-Color Mottled Rusty Black
Bb’ cgcg Dd Tri-Color Mottled Slate
b’b’ cgcg nn (n-) Rr pnpn Tri-Color Pencilled Palm
b’b’ cgcg Dd nn (n-) Rr pnpn Tri-Color Pencilled Blue Palm
BB cc White (Black-based)
b’b’ cc White (Black-Winged Bronze-based)
bb cc White (Bronze-based)
*Not fully known yet.

More Information

If you want to learn more about turkey color genetics or the different varieties out there, check out Porter’s Rare Heritage Turkeys website, the FeatherSite, or the Turkey Color Genetics 101 Facebook group.
These are the best available sources on turkeys genetics and varieties.


Support us

You want to contribute to our project? Please contact us. We really appreciate all help that we can get.


Credits

A special thanks to Kevin Porter (Porter’s Rare Heritage Turkeys) an all our other supporters.


Studies

Title: A TRIPLE-ALLELE SERIES AND PLUMAGE COLOR IN TURKEYS
Year: 1945
Link: http://www.genetics.org/content/genetics/30/4/305.full.pdf


Title: Variability of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene explains the segregation of the bronze locus in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)
Year: 2010
Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45200082_Variability_of_the_melanocortin_1_receptor_MC1R_gene_explains_the_segregation_of_the_bronze_locus_in_turkey_Meleagris_gallopavo


Title: Turkey Management
Year: 1939
Link: http://chla.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=chla;cc=chla;idno=3317008;q1=Turkey%20management;frm=frameset;view=image;seq=1;page=root;size=s


Titel: INHERITANCE OF SPOTTING IN THE PLUMAGE OF TURKEYS
Year: 1955
Link: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article-abstract/46/6/285/899440


Titel: Gender-specific fading down turkey breed
Year: 1996
Link: https://patents.google.com/patent/US5959172


Titel: HAIRY, A GENE CAUSING ABNORMAL PLUMAGE IN THE TURKEY
Year: 1954
Link: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article-abstract/45/4/197/796914?redirectedFrom=fulltext


Titel: Inhibited Feathering: A New Dominant Sex-Linked Gene in the Turkey
Year: 1997
Link: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article/88/3/238/2186827


Titel: Faded Bronze Plumage: An Autosomal Mutant in the Turkey
Year: 1949
Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0032579119508665


Titel: AN AUTOSOMAL NAKED MUTATION AND ASSOCIATED POLYDACTYLISM: in Beltsville Small White Turkeys
Year: 1961
Link: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article-abstract/52/4/183/812749?redirectedFrom=PDF


Titel: DOMINANT SEX-LINKED LATE-FEATHERING IN THE TURKEY
Year: 1961
Link: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article-abstract/52/3/99/889279?redirectedFrom=PDF


Titel: Early and late feathering in turkey and chicken: same gene but different mutations
Year: 2018
Link: https://gsejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12711-018-0380-3


Titel: SEX-LINKED ALBINISM IN THE TURKEY
Year: 1942
Link: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article-abstract/33/2/69/830511?redirectedFrom=fulltext


Titel: THE INHERITANCE OF PLUMAGE COLOR IN THE TURKEY
Year: 1943
Link: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article-abstract/34/8/246/789354?redirectedFrom=PDF


Titel: Detection of Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) polymorphism and its relation to plumage colors in local turkey
Year: 2019
Link: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1755-1315/388/1/012033